Epibulus insidiator
Source: Amada44 / CC-BY-SA-3.0
Epibulus insidiator
Source: JJPhoto.dk
Epibulus insidiator
Source: JJPhoto.dk
Epibulus insidiator
Source: JJPhoto.dk
Epibulus insidiator
Source: Elisabeth Morcel / CC-BY-SA-3.0
Epibulus insidiator
Source: Alain Feulvarch / CC BY 2.0

Facts

Latin name Epibulus insidiator - (Pallas, 1770)
Common name Sling-jaw wrasse
Family Labridae - Epibulus
Origin East Indian Ocean, West Indian Ocean, Australia, The Red Sea, Indonesia, East Pacific, Central/West Pacific
Max length 54.0 cm (21.3")

As aquarium fish

Minimum volume 1500 l (396 gal)
Hardiness Average
Suitable for aquarium Suitable with care
Reef safe Reef safe with caution
Aggressiveness Docile but might be aggressive towards similar species

Food

Recommended
  • Small crustaceans (Krill, mysis, artemia...)
  • Larger crustaceans (Shrimp, crabs...)
  • Other invertebrates
  • Fish

Jumps out of open aquaria

This species is known to jump out of open aquaria.

Threat towards crustaceans

This species poses a threat towards shrimps and crabs etc., which are relatively small.

Can be a threat to small fish

This spicies might be a threat to smaller fishes.

Demand a very large aquarium when fully grown

This species needs a very large aquarium when fully grown.

Exactly how big the aquarium should be is hard to say, but the size of this species is such, that it cannot normally be kept in a home aquarium.

Live food

There is a greater chance of success with this species if one can supply a living feed to allow it to adapt to the tank.

Acclimitises best as a juvenile

This species will better acclimatize to the aquarium`s condition if introduced, when young.

Very small individuals can be very delicate.

Requires plenty of space for swimming.

This species revels in swimming and requires an aquarium with ample space.

Hermaphroditic

This species can change gender from female to male.

When a male is needed, a female changes sex and takes on the role.

Personality

This species often has a fun and interesting personality.

Docile

This species is very shy and docile, so one should be careful when keeping it with more aggressive fish.

Initially shy

This species can be very shy when first introduced into a new aquarium.

More aggressive fish can be introduced after this species has acclimatized.

Hiding places

This species needs good hiding places, for example, between live rocks.

Description

Colour can vary from brown to yellow. In captivity the fish will often be brown.

Genus description (Epibulus)

There are two species in the genus Epibulus (Slingjaw Wrasse) which get their name by the way they swing out their jaws to make a tube to catch their prey. This tube makes up about half their length.

These Wrasses live mainly of shrimp, crabs, fish and worms and this must be taken into account. They are most likely to eat living food, have therefore some live shrimps or fish ready if at first they refuse to eat frozen foods. Over time they can be made to eat various kinds of seafood.

Family description (Labridae)

Wrasses are nearly always seen in reef aquaria, since many of the species are both attractive and useful in battling a range of unwanted invertebrates like i.e. flatworms, pyramide snails.
These fish live of everything from zooplankton to large crustaceans, sea urchins and the like.

The needs and behaviour of Wrasses vary greatly, so it is vital to familiarize oneself with the specific species before buying one.

FishBase

Aquarium trade Yes
Distribution Indo-Pacific: Red Sea to South Africa (Ref. 35918) and the Hawaiian and Tuamoto islands, north to southern Japan, south to New Caledonia.
English common names Slingjaw wrasse, Telescopefish
Danish common names Rørmundet gylte
German common names Trompetenlippfisch
French common names Labre traître, Épibule trompeur, Canard

References and further reading

About references

Scott Michael. 2004. Aquarium Fish: The Slingjaw Wrasse (Epibulus insidiator) - The Fastest Jaw In The West (Pacific)! - Advanced Aquarist - (English)

Scott W. Michael. 2009. Wrasses and Parrotfishes (Reef Fishes Series Book 5) - TFH Publications / Microcosm Ltd. - (English)

Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. 2014. FishBase. World Wide Web electronic publication. www.fishbase.org, version (08/2014).

Tags

hermaphroditic, docile shy, live food, eats shrimp, eats crab, eats fish
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