Grammistes sexlineatus

Download Reef App on Google Play or App Store
Get it on Google Play Get it on App Store
Facts
Latin name Grammistes sexlineatus - (Thunberg, 1792)
Local name Goldenstriped soapfish
Family Serranidae - Grammistes
Origin East Indian Ocean, West Indian Ocean, Australia, The Red Sea, Indonesia, East Pacific, Central/West Pacific
Max length 30 cm (11,8")
As aquarium fish
Minimum volume 500 cm (132 gal)
Hardiness Hardy
Suitable for aquarium Experience, preparation and extra care required
Reef safe Reef safe with caution
Aggressiveness Mostly peaceful but might be aggressive towards similar species
Feed
Recommended Small crustaceans (Krill, mysis, artemia...)
Larger crustaceans (Shrimp, crabs...)
Other invertebrates
Fish
Beware of
Threat to fish and crustaceans

This species eats all kinds of fish, shrimps, crabs etc. which are of suitable size.

Can release poison in the water

This species can release poison into the water when stressed. It can be fatal to fish and other sea creatures.

Never add the water used to transport it, into an aquarium.

Be mindful that catching these fish with a net, will cause a lot of stress by chasing it round the tank.

Keep in mind
Requires a varied diet

This species must be fed with an appropriately varied diet.

Thrive best on their own

These fish flourish better without other members of the same species in the aquarium.

Heavy load

This species eats a great deal and demands an aquarium that can tolerate such a heavy load.

Live food

There is a greater chance of success with this species if one can supply a living feed to allow it to adapt to the tank.

Hiding places

This species needs good hiding places, for example, between live rocks.

Nocturnal

This species is nocturnal and therefore the most active when the light is dimmed or turned off.

Descriptions and further reading
Description

When young these fish can resemble Cardinalfish, such as Apogon novemfasciatus.

Family description (Serranidae)

The Sea Bass family (Serranidae) spans a broad spectrum with regards to how suitable they are to aquaria, as some are best suited to specialist or larger aquaria, while other are often seen in reef aquaria.

Below are described the five subfamilies one sees most often in aquaria. There are however other species one can also keep under the right circumstances, but these are for the most, large predatory fish.

Anthias (Anthiinae)
The Anthias species spans over many different genera, but the most common is the Pseudanthias genus. They mostly have an attractive orange or pink shade.

They are generally all reef safe and peaceful.
There is however a large difference to their food requirements, some species demand constant feeding, whereas others can get used to being fed once a day.

The easiest species are the following: P. bartelettorum, Anthias, Luzonichthys, Nemanthias, Odontanthias, Pseudanthias, Sacura and Serranocirrhitus

Liopropomatinae
This subfamily encompasses some of the smallest fish in the Serranidae family, they can be very colourful but shy. The Liopropoma genus encompasses many species which are suitable for aquaria, however they normally thrive best in a very peaceful- or nano aquarium.

Grouper (Epinephelinae)
These fish grow typically too large for most home aquaria. There are however some species that do lend themselves to the slightly bigger domestic aquarium. Several of the species look very impressive and often have a interesting personality, and they often recognize the aquarist and will become tame over time. 

Groupers are predatory fish and eat everything they can swallow; fish, crabs, shrimps and sometimes other invertebrates. Like most large predatory fish they excrete a lot of nutrients to the water, so one therefore needs a good filter system.

Groupers include among others the following genera: Aethaloperca, Cephalopholis, Chromileptes, Epinephelus, Paranthias and Pogonoperca

Soapfishes (Grammistinae)
These fish are like the Groupers predatory fish, but they do not typically, grow so large. They are relatively hardy, but some of the species demand a thorough preperation if one wants to be successful.

Soapfishes are generally very shy and will often hide under an overhang during the day, and hunt at night.

Soapfishes include among others the genera: Grammistes

Serraninae
The most common genera in captivity is Dwarf Seabasses (Serranus) and Hamlets (Hypoplectrus).

See the description of the individual genera below.

FishBase
Aquarium trade Yes
Distribution Indo-Pacific: Red Sea to the Marquesan and Mangaréva islands, north to southern Japan, south to New Zealand (Ref. 5755).
French common names Savonnette
Savon à raies d'or
Vieille plate canal
Feuille de canne à sucre
Mérou à rayures d'or
Poisson savon bagnard
English common names Soapfish
Sixstripe soapfish
Skunkfish
Sixline soapfish
Lined soapfish
Golden-striped soapfish
Goldenstriped soapfish
Goldstriped soapfish
Black and white striped soapfish
Danish common names Gulstribet sæbefisk
German common names Goldstreifenbarsch
References and further reading

About references

Scott W. Michael. 2001. Basslets, Dottybacks & Hawkfishes: v. 2 (Reef Fishes) TFH Publications / Microcosm Ltd. - (English)
Bob Fenner. The Soapfishes, Family Grammistidae, or Tribe Grammistini of the Serranidae, in part, or... - Wet Web Media - (English)
WWM Crew. FAQs about the Basses called Soapfishes - Wet Web Media - (English)

Bob Fenner. The Basses, Family Serranidae - Wet Web Media - (English)