Gymnothorax flavimarginatus

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Facts
Latin name Gymnothorax flavimarginatus - (Rüppell, 1830)
Local name Yellow-edged moray
Family Muraenidae - Gymnothorax
Origin East Indian Ocean, West Indian Ocean, Australia, The Red Sea, Indonesia, East Pacific, Central/West Pacific
Max length 240 cm (94,5")
As aquarium fish
Minimum volume 1500 cm (396 gal)
Hardiness Hardy
Suitable for aquarium Suitable for special aquariums
Reef safe Reef safe with caution
Aggressiveness Might be aggressive towards similar species
Feed
Recommended Larger crustaceans (Shrimp, crabs...)
Fish
Beware of
Threat towards crustaceans

This species poses a threat towards shrimps and crabs etc., which are relatively small.

Escape specialist

Morays can easily escape from aquaria, they can even move loose lids and glass covers without problems.

Threat to larger fish

This species can pose a threat towards fish that are relatively large in comparison to its own size. 

Demand a very large aquarium when fully grown

This species needs a very large aquarium when fully grown.

Exactly how big the aquarium should be is hard to say, but the size of this species is such, that it cannot normally be kept in a home aquarium.

Feeding of Moray eels

Morays should be fed a large meal every 3-4 days, as they otherwise can harm themselves by over eating.
If one has problems with getting the Morays to eat frozen fish or crustaceans, try moving the food in front of the fish with a tweezer. 

Do note, that the food must be varied and raw/fresh, whole shrimps or smelt (small fish) for example.

It can take a week before they start feeding in the aquarium, but this is not a problem.
Try feeding them live fish or shrimp if the Morays iare not eating frozen foods after a week. 

Keep in mind
Rearranges rocks and sand

This species has a habit of rearranging rocks and sand.

Make sure rocks are placed securely on the substrate, so they cannot toppled over.

Hiding places

This species needs good hiding places, for example, between live rocks.

Hermaphroditic

This species can change gender from female to male.

When a male is needed, a female changes sex and takes on the role.

Descriptions and further reading
Family description (Muraenidae)

Moray eels (Muraenidae) are predatory fish that will most commonly live off fish or crustaceans. 

To avoid overfeeding, the Moray must only be fed every 3-4 days, but may then also have a large meal.

They may dig up the substrate or move loose objects in the aquarium, so fastening the rocks and corals to the tank is a good idea.
Moray eels can easily escape from the tank if not tightly closed. They can lift lids and glass covers, do not underestimate their escape ability.

It is important that the Moray can, with its full length, hide between the rocks.

There are a few Moray eels which are suitable for reef aquaria, but the bigger species can only live in large tanks with other big fish.

Many Morays have a slightly poisonous bite, although it is not normally dangerous for people. One must not underestimate the strength of their bite however.  

FishBase
Aquarium trade Yes
Distribution Indo-Pacific: Red Sea and South Africa (Ref. 3257) eastward to the Tuamoto and Austral islands, north to the Ryukyu and Hawaiian islands, south to New Caledonia. Eastern Pacific: Costa Rica, Panama and the Galapagos (Ref. 9324). Southeast Atlantic: Sou
English common names Yellow-edged moray
Yellow-margined moray
Yellow edged moray
Yellow margin moray
Yellow-margin moray
Yellowmargin moray
Yellow-edged moray eel
German common names Gelbbraune muräne
Danish common names Gulrandet muræne
French common names Murène à points jaunes
Murène marbrée
Murène javanaise
Murène queue verte
References and further reading

About references

Scott W. Michael. 2001. Reef Fishes volume 1 - TFH Publications / Microcosm Ltd. - (English)
Frank Marini. 2002. A Serpent For Your Reef Tank: A Look at Fish-Safe Eels - Reefkeeping Magazine - (English)
Mike Maddox. 2009. Morays! - Tropical Fish Hobbyist Magazine - (English)
Kirby Adams. Five Favorite Eels - Wet Web Media - (English)
Bob Fenner. The Moray Eels, Family Muraenidae, pt. 1 - Wet Web Media - (English)
Bob Fenner. The Moray Eels, Family Muraenidae, pt. 2, Less Aquarium Suitable Species - Wet Web Media - (English)
Marco Lichtenberger. 2007. Moray Eels Bite—But Are They Poisonous? - Tropical Fish Hobbyist - (English)